Finding home: South African migration to New Zealand

Christine Winbush, Rachel Selby

Abstract


South Africans have migrated to New Zealand either deliberately abandoning their country of birth or drawn to New Zealand as a country opening its arms to them to begin a new life. Leaving home means many do wait for their souls to arrive in their newly adopted home. Many have suffered grief and loss, while adapting and settling into a new country and culture. Most of the families that have come to New Zealand are either of English or Afrikaans background. They bring skills needed in New Zealand and while many have readily adapted there are many who have struggled with the change. This paper addresses the issue of culture shock and other associated tensions experienced by South African mi- grants with Afrikaans as their first language. Themes addressed in this article emerged from a review of the literature and in the course of a research project. They represent issues of importance for New Zealand teachers, social workers, counsellors, mental health workers and all who work with migrants. 


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.11157/anzswj-vol27iss1-2id16

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