Counselling in social work: A legitimate role?

Petro Booysen, Barbara Staniforth

Abstract


INTRODUCTION: Social work roles can sometimes be considered to sit on a continuum between a community work/social change perspective and a therapeutic work perspective. One perspective could be preferred above the other, at a particular time and in a particular context, or both perspectives could be supported. This article explores the legitimate function of counselling in social work in Aotearoa New Zealand.

METHODS: Data were obtained sequentially through 16 in-depth interviews and four focus groups in a qualitative PhD study. The respondents were practising social workers from various ethnicities and fields of practice represented in Aotearoa New Zealand. Both the interview and focus group data were analysed using a general inductive and thematic data analysis method.

FINDINGS: The data demonstrate a relationship between counselling and social work, that social workers regularly use counselling skills and that social workers have a need to develop their clinical skills. Rigid boundaries between the two professions can have adverse effects for clients at times when multi-skilled professionals are needed; participants in this study are calling for ethicality and accountability in this regard.

CONCLUSION: The findings from the data confirm the legitimacy of counselling in social work and have implications for social work practice, education, and continued professional development.


Keywords


Counselling; social work; therapeutic social work; clinical social work; micro skills; casework.

Full Text:

PDF

References


Asquith, J., Clark, C., & Waterhouse, L. (2005). The role of the social worker in the 21st century. Retrieved from http://www.gov.scot/resource/doc/47121/0020821.pdf

Beddoe, E., & Maidment, J. (2009). Mapping knowledge for social work practice: Critical intersections. South Melbourne, VIC: Cengage Learning.

Bertolino, B. (2010). Strengths-based engagement and practice: Creating effective helping relationships. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Brandell, J. (2014). Essentials of clinical social work. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE.

Braun, V., & Clarke, V. (2006). Using thematic analysis in psychology. Qualitative Research in Psychology, 3(2), 77–101. http://dx.doi.org/10.1191/1478088706qp063oa

Brearley, J. (1995). Counselling and social work. Bristol, England: Open University Press.

Connolly, M., & Harms, L. (Eds.). (2009). Social work: Contexts and practice (2nd ed.). South Melbourne, VIC: Oxford University Press.

Connolly, M., & Harms, L. (Eds.). (2011). Social work from theory to practice. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

Connolly, M., & Harms, L. (Eds.). (2013). Social work: Contexts and practice (3rd ed.). South Melbourne, VIC: Oxford University Press.

Dominelli, L. (2009). Anti-oppressive practice: The challenges of the twenty-first century. In R. Adams, L. Dominelli, & M. Payne (Eds.), Social work: Themes, issues and critical debates (3rd ed., pp. 49–64). Basingstoke, England: Palgrave Macmillan.

Durie, M. (1985) Counselling Māori people. Paper presented at the New Zealand Counselling and Guidance Association Hui, Tu Tangata Urban Marae, Palmerston North.

Durie, M. (2003). Paiheretia: An integrated approach to counselling. In Nga kahui pou: Launching Māori futures (pp. ??–??). Wellington, NZ: Huia.

Durie, M., & Hermansson, G. (1990). Counselling Māori people in New Zealand Aotearoa. International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling, 13(2), 107–118. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00115706

Eketone, A. (2006). Tapuwae: A vehicle for community change. Community Development Journal, 41(4), 467–480. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cdj/bsl028

Healy, K. (2012). Social work methods and skills: The essential foundations of practice. Houndmills, England: Palgrave Macmillan.

Hill, M., Ford, J., & Meadows, F. (1990). The place of counselling in social work. Practice, 4(3), 156–172. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09503159008416892

International Federation of Social Work. (2014). Definition of social work. Retrieved from http://ifsw.org/get-involved/global-definition-of-social-work/

Jones-Smith, E. (2014). Strengths-based therapy: Connecting theory, practice, and skills. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE.

Maidment, J., & Egan, R. (Eds.) (2009). Practice skills in social work and welfare: More than just common sense (2nd ed.). Crows Nest, NSW: Allen & Unwin.

Maidment, J., & Egan, R. (Eds.). (2016). Practice skills in social work & welfare: More than just common sense (3rd ed.). Crows Nest, NSW: Allen & Unwin.

McCashen, W. (2010). The strengths approach: A strengths-based resource for sharing power and creating change. Bendigo, VIC: St Luke’s Innovative Resources.

McCreary, J. (1971). The School of Science: Part one—The Martians. The New Zealand Social Worker, 7(1), 9–17.

McDonald, D. (1998). Social work in Aotearoa New Zealand: An introduction. Auckland, A/NZ: Addison Wesley Longman.

Miller, L. (2012). Counselling skills for social work (2nd ed.). Los Angeles, CA: SAGE.

Munford, G. (2000). Counselling and social work perspectives. Unpublished Research Project, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand.

Munford, R., & Sanders, J. (2011). Embracing the diversity of practice: Indigenous knowledge and mainstream social work practice. Journal of Social Work Practice, 25(1), 63–77.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02650533.2010.532867

Nash, M. (1998). People, policies and practice. Social work Education in Aotearoa/New Zealand from 1949–1995 (Unpublished doctoral dissertation). Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand.

New Zealand Association of Counsellors. (2016). What is counselling? Retrieved from http://www.nzac.org.nz/what_is_counselling_.cfm

Payne, M. (2014). Modern social work theory (4th ed.). Chicago, IL: Lyceum Books.

Riggall, S. (2012). Using counselling skills in social work (Transforming social work practice). Los Angeles, CA: Learning Matters.

Rochford, T. (2004). Whare tapa wha: A Māori model of a unified theory of health. Journal of Primary Prevention, 25(1), 41–57.

Seden, J. (1999). Counselling skills in social work practice. Philadelphia, PA: Open University Press.

Seden, J. (2005). Counselling skills in social work practice [Ebrary version]. Retrieved from http://www.ebrary.com

Staniforth, B. (2010a). Past present and future perspectives on the role of counselling in social work in Aotearoa New Zealand (Unpublished doctoral dissertation). Massey University, Auckland, New Zealand.

Staniforth, B. (2010b). Counselling in social work in Aotearoa New Zealand: The historical, political and socio-cultural evolution. Aotearoa New Zealand Social Work, 22(3), 3–14.

Staniforth, B., & Booysen, P. (2016). Counselling training in social work in Aotearoa New Zealand. Are we there yet? Advances in Social Work and Welfare Education, 18(2), 24–38.

Staniforth, B., Fouché, C., & Beddoe, L. (2014). Public perception of social work and social workers in Aotearoa New Zealand. Aotearoa New Zealand Social Work, 26(2/3), 48–60.

Staniforth, B., Fouché, C., & O’Brien, M. (2011). Still doing what we do: Defining social work in the 21st century. Journal of Social Work, 11(2), 191–208. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1468017310386697

Social Workers Registration Board. (2013). The process for recognition/re-recognition of social work qualifications in New Zealand. Wellington, New Zealand: Author. Retrieved from http://www.swrb.govt.nz/doc-man/policies-1/292-programme-recognition-standards-3

Social Workers Registration Board. (2016). Competence. Wellington, New Zealand: Author. Retrieved from http://www.swrb.govt.nz/doc-man/policies-1/320-competence-4

Thomas, D. (2006). A general inductive approach for analyzing qualitative evaluation data. American Journal of Evaluation, 27(2), 237–246.

Walsh-Tapiata, W. (2004). The past the present and the future: The New Zealand indigenous experience of social work. Social Work Review, 16(4), 30–37.

Younghusband, E. (1981). The newest profession: A short history of social work. London, UK: Community Care/IPC Business Press.




DOI: https://doi.org/10.11157/anzswj-vol29iss1id214

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.




Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.