Theories in Māori social work: Indigenous approaches to working with and for indigenous people

Awhina Hollis-English

Abstract


Māori social work practice has been developed upon a strong foundation of indigenous knowledge, theories and values. Theories can be used to validate social work practice and to build and enhance the engagement between workers and whānau. This article describes some Māori social work theories and how they have developed both within the social work world and that of neighbouring professions. A number of theories have been described by Māori social workers from across Aotearoa as the foundations for their social work practice. Theoretical discourse in the world of Māori social workers enables one to grow and develop their practice, leaning on ancestral knowledge and valuing the skills that are gained through understanding tikanga in a contemporary context. Through enhancing one’s knowledge of Te Ao Māori and evidence-based practice, social workers can use, develop and create Māori theories in a social work context for the benefit of Māori whānau and communities.

Keywords


māori social work; māori social work practice; māori social work theory; te ao māori; tikanga;

Full Text:

PDF

References


Bishop, R. (1995). Collaborative research stories: Whakawhanaungatanga. (Unpublished PhD thesis). University of Otago, Dunedin.

Bishop, R. (1996). Collaborative research stories: Whakawhanaungatanga. Palmerston North: Dunmore Press.

Bishop, R. (2003). Changing power relations in education: Kaupapa Māori messages for ‘mainstream’ education in Aotearoa/New Zealand. Comparative Education, 39(2), 221-238.

Cunningham, C. (2000). A framework for addressing Māori knowledge in research, science and technology. Pacific Health Dialog, 7(1), 62.

Cram, F. & Smith, L. (2004). Māori women talk about accessing health care. He Pukenga Kōrero, 7(2), 1-8.

Durie, M. (1998a). Te mana, te kawanatanga: The politics of Māori self-determination. Auckland: Oxford University Press.

Durie, M. (1998b). Whaiora: Māori health development (2nd ed.). Auckland: Oxford University Press.

Durie, M. H., & Mental Health Foundation of New Zealand. (1999). Māori culture identity and its implications for mental health services. Auckland: Mental Health Foundation of New Zealand.

Eketone, A. D. (2004). Tapuwae: Waka as a vehicle for community action. (Unpublished Masters thesis). University of Otago, Dunedin.

Eketone, A. D. (2008). Theoretical underpinnings of Kaupapa Māori directed practice. MAI Review, (1), 1-11.

Hollis, A. N. R. (2006). Pūao-te-Ata-tū and Māori social work methods. (Unpublished Masters thesis). University of Otago, Dunedin.

Hollis-English, A. N. R. (2012). Māori social workers: Experiences within social service organisations. (Unpublished PhD thesis). University of Otago, Dunedin.

Nepe, T. (1991). E hao e tēnei reanga te toi huarewa tipuna. (Unpublished Masters thesis) University of Auckland, Auckland.

Patterson, J. (1992). Exploring Māori values. Auckland: Dunmore Press.

Penetito, K. H. (2005). Me mau kia ita ki te tuakiri o te whānau ma te whānau e tipu ai: Whānau identity and whānau development are interdependent. (Unpublished Masters thesis) Auckland University of Technology, Auckland.

Pihama, L. (2001). Tīhei mauri ora: Honouring our voices: Mana wahine as a kaupapa Māori: Theoretical framework. (Unpublished PhD thesis). University of Auckland, Auckland.

Pōhatu, T. (2003). Māori world-views: Source of innovative social work choices. Retrieved 22 July 2010 from www.kaupapamaori.com.

Pōhatu, T. (2005). Āta: Growing respectful relationships. Retrieved 22 July 2010 from www.kaupapamaori.com.

Russell, K. (2000). Landscape. Perceptions of Kai Tahu I Mua, Āianei, Ā Muri Ake. (Unpublished PhD thesis). University of Otago, Dunedin.

Ruwhiu, L. (2001). Bicultural issues in Aotearoa New Zealand social work. In M. Connolly (Ed.). Social Work in New Zealand: Context and Practice. Oxford University Press: Auckland.

Smith, G.H. (1997). The development of kaupapa Māori: Theory and praxis. (Unpublished PhD thesis). University of Auckland, Auckland.

Smith, L. T. (1999). Decolonizing methodologies: Research and indigenous peoples. Dunedin: Zed Books, University of Otago Press.

Tate, H. A. (2010). Towards some foundations of a systematic Māori theology. He tirohanga anganui ki ētahi kaupapa hōhonu mō te whakapono Māori. (Unpublished PhD thesis). Melbourne College of Divinity, Melbourne.

Tate, H. A. & Paparoa, T. (1986) (Eds.). Karanga Hokianga. Hokianga: Motuti Community Trust.

Te Wana. (2010). Accreditation programme. Retrieved from: http://tewana.org.nz/.

Walker, S. (1996). Kia tau te rangimarie: Kaupapa Māori theory as a resistance against the construction of Māori as the other. (Unpublished Masters thesis). University of Auckland, Auckland.




DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.11157/anzswj-vol27iss4id432

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.




Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.